Schulz Osteoichthyology Collection

The Zooarchaeology Lab's Peter D. Schulz Osteoichthyology Collection encompasses 861 osteological specimens representing 290 different fish species.
Schulz Osteoichthyology Collection

Leopard Shark

Peter D. Schulz Osteoichthyology Collection was initiated by Richard Casteel (Ph.D., 1972) in the late 1960s and early 1970s. and since then has been expanded considerably through the concerted efforts of Peter Schulz (Ph.D., 1981) from the mid-1970s through his final donations to UC Davis in 2013. Contributions by fish biologists and paleontologists J. Dentler, P. Moyle, M. Roeder, T. Taylor, and C. Vanicek, among others, helped to expand the quantity and quality of this fish collection.

The specimens are primarily of native and non-native California species, but the collection also includes a large number of samples of Asian species that were collected to assist with studying historical Chinese zooarchaeological assemblages. The number of Arctic fish species in the collection also has grown, but the focus remains on the native California collection. Fish scales, most of which correspond to the osteological specimens in this collection, are housed with the Museum of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology in Storer Hall.Peter D. Schulz Osteoichthyology Collection was initiated by Richard Casteel (Ph.D., 1972) in the late 1960s and early 1970s. and since then has been expanded considerably through the concerted efforts of Peter Schulz (Ph.D., 1981) from the mid-1970s through his final donations to UC Davis in 2013. Contributions by fish biologists and paleontologists J. Dentler, P. Moyle, M. Roeder, T. Taylor, and C. Vanicek, among others, helped to expand the quantity and quality of this fish collection. 

The specimens are primarily of native and non-native California species, but the collection also includes a large number of samples of Asian species that were collected to assist with studying historical Chinese zooarchaeological assemblages. The number of Arctic fish species in the collection also has grown, but the focus remains on the native California collection. Fish scales, most of which correspond to the osteological specimens in this collection, are housed with the Museum of Wildlife, Fish and Conservation Biology in Storer Hall.

Link to Collection